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#1 - #5 - Armillaria 'Shrooms
#2 -
Plants of the Week #6 - Clock is Ticking
#3 - Protect Trees from Deer Rubs #7 - Some Great Shrubs
#4 - Tomatoes and Peppers Resist Ripening #8 - Giant Mosquitoes?
#9 - Sour Grapes
Protect Trees from Deer Rubs
Taken from the B.Y.G.L. (Buckeye Yard and Garden Online) Newsletter
Lead Editor: Curtis Young; Contributing Authors: Pam Bennett, Joe Boggs, Julie Crook, Jim Chatfield,
Erik Draper, Dave Dyke, Gary Gao, Tim Malinich, Cindy Meyer, Amy Stone, Marne Titchnell and Curtis Young.
September is here and Ohio’s white-tail deer population is gearing up for mating season. The bucks have completed their antler growth, which begins around April and extends roughly through August, and are ready to start polishing them up in order to attract the ladies! How do bucks polish their antlers? As the antlers grow, they are covered with a layer of soft, vascularized tissue, commonly referred to as velvet. Polishing requires the buck to rub the layer of velvet off in order to display their literal crowning glory, although sometimes the velvet will dry up and slough off without rubbing. Rubbing stations are often the trunks of saplings or small trees that fit in and around the antlers perfectly.

While the white-tail deer breeding season ranges from October through December, velvet removal has already started in some parts of the state and can continue through September. Protect saplings and small trees from deer rubs by wrapping woven-wire (chicken wire) around the trunk of the tree. The wire should be 4 – 5' high with several inches of space between the tree and the wire. There are also plastic tree wraps and other types of tree guards commercially available. Rubbing is often most intense during and shortly after velvet removal, but can continue throughout the breeding season, as bucks will rub their glandular foreheads over rubs to leave a scent behind. It is recommended to leave tree protection up through the winter.

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